Archive for the ‘Announcement’ Category

Women…..want to act in a children’s play?

Feel like performing?

rafiki is seeking women actors for a programme titled What do you Say to a Dragon. The programme for children will roll out in July and run till September.Prior acting experience is not a criteria.

Workshop-audition

Ashirvad

Off St. Mark’s road

Saturday 12th March, 2011

10am to 1pm

Call Ravindra on 9986371543 for further details

Kannada Film Screening: “NAVILAADAVARU”

A Kannada film realized by a small group of enthusiasts, produced with just Rs 35,000. After the screening there will be an interaction / discussion on the film.

www.samvaada.com hopes to develop meaningful discussion on this.

Seminar Topic: “Navilaadavaru in the context of Endhiran”

Date: Sunday 28th Nov 2010, 11am – 2pm @

Surana College Auditorium, South End Main Road, Basavangudi, Bangalore.

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Hobitute Institute: Art Workshops

Hobitute Art Foundation is conducting a series of art workshops focusing ancient fine-art forms of India at its Center for Art Education, No. 109, 2nd Floor, ADA Rangamandira Building, JC Road, Opp. Ravindra Kalakshetra, Bangalore 560002.

First in the workshop series is Madhubani Painting which is from 25th to 30th November 2010, excluding Sunday. This workshop should be attended by Interior designers, fine-art students, housewives with painting interests, and art lovers with some touch in painting or taken painting as hobby.

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Beedhi Vyaaparigala Hakkotaya Andolana: Protest March against eviction of vendors

A city level campaign of Street Hawkers, Dalits, Human Rights Activists, Social and Progressive Organizations

End our evictions. They are unconstitutional and contrary to the National Street Vendors Policy

Value our contributions to the society. Respect our fundamental rights. We demand legal cover and social security

The past several months, we, the street hawkers of Bangalore, have been the victims of forcible eviction by the BBMP, the police and Muzrai departments who have undertake an aggressive and continuous exercise to ‘clear’ the streets and pavements of Shivajinagar, Jayanagar, Ulsoor and Gandhinagar without giving us any prior notice or allocation of any alternate location for our livelihood (see details in adjoining sheet). Since then we and our families are struggling to survive as we have been left with absolutely no source of income – we are unable to pay the school fees for our children and many have been pulled out of school, our landlords have given us notice as we have not paid our house rent. The reason given for our evictions is apparently that we are impeding flow of traffic and pedestrians or that our presence makes the city ugly.

Street hawkers are an integral part of Bangalore’s daily life and its residents are all beneficiaries of the work of the street hawkers. From the vegetable vendor pushing his cart in localities, to the cobbler, the coconut vendor, the flower seller outside places of worship, the tea seller, the santhes, etc., the general public depend on street hawkers for their daily needs and convenience. In fact it is impossible to imagine Bangalore, or any other city, without its street hawkers.

These illegal actions of the BBMP and the police violate our [street vendors’] fundamental rights enshrined under Article 19(1) (g) and Article 21of the Constitution of India, as well as Article 39(a) of the Constitution of India,.This also represents the failure of the State to fulfil its obligations to guarantee everyone, the right to work, free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment as enshrined under Article 23 of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and to take appropriate steps to safeguard this right as derived from Article 6(1) of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

These actions of the BBMP are not just illegal and unconstitutional but also contrary to the National Policy on Urban Street Vendors, 2009 issued by the Ministry of Housing & Urban Poverty Alleviation, Government of India. It is pertinent to note that the Policy recognizes street vendors as an integral and legitimate part of the urban retail trade and distribution system. It also recognizes that street vendors provide valuable services to the urban masses while eking out a living through their own enterprise, limited resources and labour. It is also necessary to point out that after the Policy was passed, the Hon’ble Prime Minister has sent a letter to all the Chief Ministers seeking that the National Policy on Urban Street Vendors 2009 be implemented and legislation be enacted taking into account the Model Bill which is part of the Policy to “enable street vendors to ply their trade without harassment”.

Moreover, the BBMP is also in violation of the judgments of the Hon’ble Supreme Court which has recognized street vending as a fundamental right under the Constitution of this country, and as we should know, fundamental rights cannot be denied to anyone. In fact, the Supreme Court, in Mahrashtra Ekta Hawkers’ Union & Another – Versus-Municipal Corporation, Greater Mumbai & Others, in its order dated 12th February 2007, has observed that any steps taken in regard to Street Vendors should be in consonance with the aims and objects of the National Policy to render some sort of succour to urban street vendors to enable them to earn livelihood through hawking.

In spite of all our efforts to secure our rights to conduct our business fulfilled, the BBMP has not met our demands. We are therefore conducting a protest march on Thursday, Oct 21 , 11am, from Russell Market Chowk to BBMP Head Office to press for our demands:

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Lecture on THE EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUNESS FOR A GREEN PLANET

Lecture on

THE EVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUNESS FOR A GREEN PLANET

By Deepti Diwakar

18 September 2010, Saturday, 5:30 PM

At British Library, Bangalore

Climate change knows no national boundaries and natural environment and wildlife species are becoming extinct, perhaps never to be replaced again. Can we evolve holistically instead of just being intellectual? Let us reconsider our relationship with the earth.

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FAQ’s about Snakes

Snake! The very word seems to evoke a feeling of terror in the mind of the average person; but if one has better knowledge of these creatures, one can see that much of the dread is misplaced. Here are some FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) about snakes, answered by P Gowirshankar, a herpetologist who has been actively associated with the Agumbe Rainforest Research Station (ARRS), which has had the only telemetry project for tracking the King Cobra in that region. Gowrishankar is at present located in Bangalore, pursuing his doctoral studies.

1. I see a snake in my yard or house, and I don’t want to go close to find out if it is poisonous or not. My first instinct is to panic. What should I do? Will my actions be different in case the snake is quiet, and in case it is moving about? What if it is in an odd place where it cannot be easily dislodged/chased off?

Yes, the first instinct is to panic, nothing much can be done about that. If you are aware and can do it, do your best to replace that fear with knowledge and act accordingly. If the snake is moving constantly keep a watch on it from a safe distance. If the snake is coiled up or resting nothing much to worry, do not disturb it but do keep a watch. Call any of the animal welfare organizations in Bangalore and they will help retrieve the snake.

2. In case I am bitten, or I see someone bitten by a snake, what should I do? (Especially if the snake is no longer around, and I cannot find out if the snake was venomous or not)

Not all snake bites are from venomous snakes. However do look out for the following symptoms and follow the first aid listed below:

General symptoms of a bite from a venomous snake:

* Wound site: Fang marks, discoloration, burning sensation, blistering of skin, local pain, oedema
* Bleeding from the wound that does not seem to stop
* Bleeding gums
* Progressive swelling of the bitten limb
* Drooping eyelids
* Difficulty in speaking
* Difficulty in breathing
* Drowsiness, unsteadiness

First Aid

* Calm and reassure the patient. Only a small percentage of snakebites prove serious. Panic can increase the heart rate and speed the spread of venom in the body.
* Remove any constricting items worn by the patient such as bangles, bands, bracelets, finger rings, watch and so on.
* Completely immobilize the patient: Lay them down and keep them still. Splint the bitten limb to prevent movement.
* A bitten leg should be splinted from below the ankle to the top of the thigh, and then strapped to the other leg to keep the entire lower half of the body still. A bitten arm should be splinted from the fingertips to the shoulder, and then strapped firmly (not tightly) to the side of the body.
* Keep the wound clean; do not apply mud, manure or other poultices, if the wound requires washing use uncontaminated water to gently clean it.
* Do not allow the person to walk or move about; keep them completely immobile and take them to hospital as soon after the bite as possible.
* The victim should be kept warm. Watch out for the general symptoms (listed above) and inform the doctor.

The only remedy for venomous snakebite is anti-venom serum. Polyvalent anti-venom serum is effective against the bites of the Big Four: Common Cobra, Saw-scaled Viper, Common Krait, Russell’s viper.

Note: Only if safely possible, try and get a good look at the snake (or photograph it) to help the doctor identify it, and treat the bite accordingly.

Here’s what you should not do when a person has been bitten by a snake

* Do not give sedatives to calm the patient.
* Do not tie an electric cable, string or rubber tourniquet or ligatures, and do not cut the bite site, or the bitten limb.
* Do not use ice packs, electric shock or suction at the site of bite.
* Do not elevate the limb.
* Do not use potassium permanganate.
* Do not let the patient walk or run; keep them absolutely immobilized.
* Do not administer alcoholic beverage or any medication
* Do not give food or water, as both may be a choking hazard if the person vomits.
* Do not waste time with quack ‘remedies’ such as ‘snake stones’, or chanting mantras. Go for anti-venom serum without delay.

3. Where would I be able to get snake anti-venom in Bangalore?

Anti-venom is stocked in most leading hospitals of Bangalore, including Manipal Hospital, Baptist Hospital, Mallya Hospital, Bowring Hospital and St John’s Medical Hospital.

4. Should I administer anti-venom in any case? If the snake was not a poisonous one, will the anti-venom have bad effects?

No. Medical assistance is mandatory as it has to be administered through intravenous means. It is best for doctors to take a call on whether to administer anti-venom after observing the symptoms. Unnecessary use of anti-venom may cause allergic reactions.

5. What should I do to prevent snakes from entering my garden or home? I know they are good for the ecosystem, but I don’t want to deal with them.

Keep the garden clean and free from mounds of litter. Keep flower pots away from doors and windows and do not stock them close to each other. Make sure there are no rats breeding in the garden or in the house. Keep the place well lit; else use a torch to move around.

6. Is it true that snakes are to be found where there are termite mounds?

Not necessarily. They need to regulate their body temperature so depending on the temperature, humidity, habitat and prey base they select resting places, and a termite mound is just one such resting place.

7. Is it useful to call in a snake-charmer? If so, how can I locate one?

It is better to contact animal welfare organizations like the following:

Compassion Unlimited Plus Action (CUPA)
LR Nagar, Koramangala
Bengaluru – 560047
Ph No 22947302

Bannerghatta Rehabilitation Centre (WRRC)
Survey No. 129, Jigni Hobli,
Anekal Taluk, Bannerghatta,
Bangalore – 560 083
Ph No 22947307/ 22947300/ 22947301
wrrcbrc[at]gmail[dot]com

Karuna Animal Welfare Association Of Karnataka
Kasturba Road, Cubbon Park
Bangalore- 560001
Ph No 22860205, 23411181

People for Animals
Survey no. 67,
Uttarahalli Road, Kengeri,
Bangalore 560 060
Ph No 2860 4767, 2860 3986, 2273 3350, 9980339880

8. Are there any common misconceptions about snakes in urban areas that I should be aware of?

There are many myths and misconceptions about snakes, which not differ much between urban and rural areas. Four of the common myths are:
a) Cobras take revenge
b) They drink milk
c) Talking about snakes at home is equal to inviting them.
d) Male combat of snakes is misunderstood to be mating and the superstition is that viewing this invites trouble for generations. ⊕

Cycling Photography Contest

Art of Bicycle Trips invites you to enter your most stunning photos —
highlighting the beauty, adventure, freedom, inspiration and art of
bicycle trips and travel — in the 1st Bicycle Travel Photo Contest.

The organizers are especially looking for beautiful photography representing the
wide range of bicycle touring and travel experiences.

Winner will get Bicycle Riding Gear. Check for more details on how to
enter, eligibility, deadlines etc. by clicking

here

Follow us on the Facebook group

here

Workshop for Children on Celebrating Ganesha Festival Responsibly

Identifying Traditional and Responsible ways of Celebrating Ganesh Chaturthi

A One Day Workshop for Children (Ages 9-15)

Ganesh Chaturthi is the birthday of Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed Hindu God. As we all know, He is a very popular god in India and has become a popular symbol around the world too. Ganesha in different art forms has broken many boundaries of caste, race, religion, and nation and has found a space in many living rooms around the world. He is a favorite among the children too. The story of his birth and the variety of delicacies made on this day are enjoyable for children. Over the last few decades, there has been a considerable shift in our societies across the country from celebrating the festival in a traditional way to a more ostentatious occasion, with little regard to the socio-economic, cultural and environmental impacts.

The workshop is aimed at helping children identify the traditional and historical significance, ways in which it was celebrated in the past, the importance of the traditional foods made on this day and ways in which the festival can be celebrated without causing harm to the environment around us.

The workshop will take children through interesting stories, videos, making clay idols, learning to make traditional decorations such as rangoli, stringing of flowers etc, learning to make traditional foods, learning through some games and more importantly learning to take responsibility towards mother earth in celebrations.

Workshop Date: Sunday, 5th September, 2010

Time: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm

Registration Fee: Rs. 200/-

Venue: ESG Office

Contact Details:

Environment Support Group, 1572, 100 feet Outer Ring Road, Banashankari 2nd Stage, Bangalore-70

Telephone: 91-80-26713559/60/61

Email: bhargavi@esgindia.org /sruthi@esgindia.org

Website: www.esgindia.org

Crafts Exhibition and Sale at Avighna

Ganesha Festival: Exhibition cum Sale

Avighna Collections is having an exhibition cum sale of various Ganesha
avatars in fibre, glass and wooden wall hangings too. This exhibition
is held at
Sankhla House, 88, Vyalikaval 3rd main, Bangalore

from

Aug 30th to Sept 10th, 2010.
Please contact 65670035.

Frames Of Mind 2010 – for photographers

Frames of Mind 2010

Submission Update


I received the content for this post from Mayur Channagere – the Moderator on this event organised by the Bangalore Photography Club.  You should find this useful.

The Bangalore Photography Club is all set with its flagship annual event Frames Of Mind 2010. This year Frames of Mind (FOM) celebrates its 5th  year of being one of the very few platforms for both amateur & professional photographers in the city to showcase their talent.

The theme for this year’s exhibition is “India Today” where photographs depicting the New India will be curated and showcased. The plan is to have several photography-based activities at the venue over three days – including talks by experts in the area, workshops, an open house where any participant can come and share his ideas/ experiments/ opinions and more. This year the event will be held at ChitraKala Parishat, between 22nd and 24th October.

Please follow the link for more information. The LAST date for submission is SEP 11.

http://bangalorephotographyclub.com/activities/fom10.html

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